KA VOICECAST for Friday, November 1st

KA VOICECAST for Friday, November 1st

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KA NEWS

LIFE IN THE UK

IT HAPPENED IN HISTORY–Guy Fawkes

LISTENING COMPREHENSION Q & A

STORY TIME —The Firework Maker’s Daughter by Phillip Pullman

WOW WORDS

 

KA NEWS for Friday, November 1st

KA’s famed essay-writing course for students in grade 4 of elementary school and above is now available as a correspondence course for students who live abroad or outside of the Kanto area. This is a serious, results-oriented program for students who wish to pass essay exams for junior high, senior high, university or the EIKEN, TOEFL, or SAT exams. Distance Learning students will write and revise weekly essays, complete grammar assignments, and build vocabulary to raise the register and effectiveness of their writing. Each student will correspond with a Personal Writing Tutor, who will guide the student through the course by email.

Students wishing to participate in the Distance Learning course must have:

• Access to the internet

• A computer with Microsoft Word and Adobe Reader

• A strong desire to improve their writing.

For more information about this exciting new program, please contact Kikokushijo Academy or follow the link.

Submissions for the winter issue of KA Voices are being accepted now. Students are welcome to submit original stories, artwork, book reviews, poetry, interviews with friends, family and KA staff, original comics, and anything you are interested in writing about. For more information, ask one of your teachers how you can contribute.

The KA Meidaimae School is offering Saturday Art Classes throughout November for children in years two through five of elementary school. Students will have the opportunity to work on some fantastic art projects while developing their technique, as well as learn art-based English vocabulary and related terms. If you are interested in taking part, please contact the KA Meidaimae School for more information at 03-3324-9903.

This year’s winter courses will be held on December 26 & 27 and will include vocabulary review classes for each track. These classes will be a great chance for students of all tracks to catch up on or review key vocabulary they’d gone over during the year, as well as an ideal opportunity for new students to pick up any vocabulary they have missed.  More information about Winter Courses will be available soon.

The KA Kids International Preschool officially opened its doors in September and applications for children aged 3-6 are still being accepted.  Children who sign up for the KAIP program will be introduced to the fast-paced, advanced reading and writing program with teachers trained in the Read Write Inc. Phonics method, currently exclusive to Kikokushijo Academy. For general information and answers to frequently asked questions, please follow the link to the KA Kids International Preschool Page.

The KA Winter Event is scheduled for Saturday, November 23. If you would like to attend but haven’t yet signed up, be sure to speak to the office staff.  This is one event you don’t want to miss!

 

LIFE IN THE UK

Before we listen to IT HAPPENED IN HISTORY, please listen out for the answers to the following three questions:

Why did the people decide to come up with a plan to get rid of the royal family?

How did King James find out about the plot to kill him and all the Lords and Commons?

In history, what is this event known as?

 

IT HAPPENED IN HISTORY

With Aidan

In the time of King James I, in the early 17th Century, many of the English people were very harshly treated because of their religion. At last they could not bear the ill-treatment any longer, and they thought of a plan to get rid of the king and queen and their eldest son.

Many barrels of gunpowder were secretly put into a cellar under the Parliament House, where James was to meet his Lords and Commons on November 5; and a man named Guy Fawkes was hired to set fire to it at the right time, and so to blow up the hall above, and all in it.

All was ready, when one of the plotters remembered that a friend of his would be at the meeting the next day. As he did not wish him to be killed, he sent him a letter, without signing his name, saying: “Do not go to the House, for there shall be a sudden blow to many, and they shall not see who hurts them”.

The lord who received this letter took it to the King’s Council, and when King James saw it, he guessed what the “sudden blow” would be. Men were sent to search the cellars, and there, on the very night before the deed was to be done, Guy Fawkes was found waiting till the time should come to set fire to the powder. He was cruelly tortured to make him tell all he knew, but he was a brave man, and he died without betraying his friends.  In history, this event is known as the Gunpowder Plot of 1605.

Since the 17th century, and every year since, on the 5th of November, bonfires have been lighted in many places in England, and “guys” burned, to remind people how an English king was once saved from a great danger.

 

Why did the people decide to come up with a plan to get rid of the royal family?

The main reason people wanted to rise up against the royal family is religious freedom.  People were ill- treated because of their religious beliefs.  If you know anything about American History, you will know it was about this time that many Europeans started to immigrate to North America to escape religious prosecution.

How did King James find out about the plot to kill him and all the Lords and Commons?

One of the plotters suddenly remembered that his friend would be attending the meeting the next day and he didn’t want to kill his friend.  He wrote him a letter warning him of the danger, and this letter was shown to the king who was wise enough to understand what a “sudden blow” might be.

In history, what is this event known as?

In history books, this event is known as the Gunpowder Plot of 1605.

STORY TIME

Please listen for  synonyms for the following 5 words:

STROPPY

TOTTER

CONSTANT

BURNED

STARTLED

The Firework Maker’s Daughter

Phillip Pullman

A thousand miles ago, in a country east of the jungle and south of the mountains, there lived a Firework Maker called Lalchand and his daughter Lila.

Lalchand’s wife had died when Lila was young. The child was a cross little thing, always crying and refusing her food, but Lalchand built a cradle for her in the corner of the workshop, where she could see the sparks play and listen to the fizz and crackle of gunpowder. Once she was out of the cradle, she toddled around the workshop laughing as the fire flared and sparks danced.  Many a time she burnt her little fingers, but Lalchand splashed water on them and kissed her better, and soon she was playful again.

When she was old enough to learn, her father began to teach her the art of making fireworks.  She began with little Crackle-dragons, six on a string.  Then she learned how to make Learning Monkeys, Golden Sneezes, and Java Lights.  Soon she was making all the simple fireworks, and thinking about more complicated ones.

One day she said, “Father, if I put some flowers of salt in a Java Light instead of cloud-powder, what would happen?”

“Try it and see,” he said.

So she did. Instead of burning with a steady green glimmer, it sprayed out wicked little sparks, each of which turned a somersault before going out.

“Not bad, Lila,” said Lalchand.  ‘What are you going to call it?”

“Mmm… Tumbling Demons,” she said.

“Excellent!  Make a dozen and we’ll put them into the New Year Festival display.”

The Tumbling Demons were a great success, and so were the Shimmering Coins that Lila invented next.  As time went on she learned more and more of her father’s art, until one day she said, “Am I a proper Firework-Maker now?

“No, no,” he said.  “By no means.  Ha!  You don’t know the start of it.  What are the ingredients of the fly-away powder?”

“I don’t know.”

“And where do you find thunder-grains?”

“I’ve never heard of thunder-grains.”

“How much scorpion oil do you put in a Krakatoa Fountain?”

“A teaspoonful?”

“What? You’d blow the whole city up.  You’ve got a lot to learn yet.  Do you really want to be a Firework-Maker, Lila?”

“Of course I do!  It’s the only thing I want!”

“I was afraid so,” he said.  “It’s my own fault.  What was I thinking of?  I should have sent you to my sister Jembavati to bring you up as a dancer.  This is no place for a girl, now I come to think of it, and just look at you! Your hair’s a mess, your fingers are burned and stained with chemicals, your eyebrows are scorched… How am I going to find a husband for you when you look like that?”

Lila was horrified.

“A husband?”

“Well, of course!  You don’t imagine you can stay here for ever, do you?”

They looked at each other as if they were strangers. Each of them had had quite the wrong idea about things, and they were both alarmed to find it out.

So Lila said no more about being a Firework-Maker, and Lalchand said no more about husbands.  But they both thought about them, all the same.

 

WOW WORDS

 

1. What word that describes Lila’s character is closest to the word STROPPY?

CROSS

The child was a cross little thing, always crying and refusing her food, but Lalchand built a cradle for her in the corner of the workshop…

In the sentence above, CROSS is an adjective and means STROPPY, irritable, short-tempered, and snappish.  As an adjective it can also mean angry, annoyed, and irritated.   And of course you know that CROSS can also be a noun and verb.  Such a small word, with so many different meanings.

 

2. We got from the story that when Lila was old enough she would walk around the workshop.  What word was used in the passage that is closest in meaning to TOTTER to describe how she walked?

TODDLE

Once she was out of the cradle, she toddled around the workshop laughing as the fire flared and sparks danced. 

TODDLE is a verb that means to move with short, unsteady steps while learning to walk.   Small children, usually between the ages of 15 months to 2 and half or so are called TODDLERS because of the way they walk.

 

3.   The firework that Lila made up did not burn with a CONSTANT flame.  What word was used in the passage that is a synonym for CONSTANT?

STEADY

Instead of burning with a steady green glimmer, it sprayed out wicked little sparks, each of which turned a somersault before going out.

In this sentence, STEADY is an adjective that means regular, even, and continuous in intensity.  STEADY can also mean, firmly fixed and not shaking or moving.  Again, STEADY can also be a noun and a verb too.

 

4.  In the story, Lila’s father Lalchand described Lila’s appearance and he said her fingers were BURNED, but used a different word.  Can you remember the word?

SCORCHED.

Your hair’s a mess, your fingers are burned and stained with chemicals, your eyebrows are scorched

SCORCHED is the past participle of SCORCH, a verb that means to burn the surface of something with a flame or heat.  SCORCHED as an adjective can be used as a modifier as in SCORCHED hair, SCORCHED landscape.

 

5. The last word to listen out for was a synonym for STARTLED.  Can you remember what word was used in the passage?

ALARMED

Each of them had had quite the wrong idea about things, and they were both alarmed to find it out.

To ALARM is a verb that means to make someone feel disturbed, startled, or worried.  The adjective ALARMING means disturbing or worrying.

 

Words that seem relatively simple can often be very complex, such as the words CROSS and ALARM that we went over today.  If you looked up these words in a dictionary, you would be quite surprised to learn their many uses.  On KA Wordcast, which airs every Tuesday, we go over 8-12 such words each week in detail.  So if you are looking for ways to study and improve your vocabulary, be sure to tune in.

 

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